29: Breeding Basics 1: Creating Your Own Bloodline

The purpose of animal breeding, in my case breeding pomeranians,  is to create a superior specimen as close to the breed standard as possible.  The Pomeranian Breed Standard is the Bible of Pomeranians.  It specifies the details of what a Pomeranian should look like, how big it should be, what kind of coat it should have, how it should move, etc etc etc.

Your breeding should be progressing closer towards this objective generation after generation of breeding.  Virtues are enhanced whilst faults and problems are weeded out.
Unlike human pro-creation which is based on love and relationships, breeding animals or animal husbandry is more non-sentimental objective attitude when it comes to improving your stock.  There should be lesser room for sentimentality but rather a decisive focus of your reaching objective…which is getting closer to the breed standard.   In the process, participants in this venture, create their own kennel name and bloodline which they could call their own and be proud of.   

One of the main tools of breeding is inbreeding and linebreeding.  Inbreeding is breeding very close relatives like father to daughter, son to mother, half brother to half sister, or even full brother to full sister.   Linebreeding is breeding more distant relatives like grandfather to grand-daughter,  grandmother to grandson, uncle to niece, auntie to nephew, first cousins, and so on.

These close and not so close relatives are bred to create a certain predictability/uniformity in the resulting litter, the objective oftentimes is resurrecting a favorite dog.   It takes three generations of continuous linebreeding/inbreeding to create a strain or your own bloodline ….this would mean a certain look that you can call your own.  This would also mean generations of breeding involving years before you can call what you have bred your own bloodline.

Accordingly, anyone who imports/or buys a dog cannot claim “bloodline” credit for the dog he imported because that is really the bloodline from the kennel it came from.  The resulting litter of that dog with another bitch will still be hardly your own bloodline.  If the breeding is linebreeding/inbreeding, then that breeding is still the bloodline of kennel of that common ancestor.  It is only after being responsible for the combinations of three generations of continuous linebreeding/inbreeding on a common ancestors or relatives of that common ancestors …plus infusing bloodlines of other related or unrelated dogs that you create your own bloodline.

In between these generations of linebreeding and inbreeding, you may have to outcross.  Outcrossing is breeding a totally unrelated partner to your stock, or a very distant relative.  Oftentimes, it is defined as having no common relations for more than five generations. You do this because of the following reasons:  1.) a certain fault is emerging making it necessary to find a new partner to clean up that  problem since another principle in breeding is not to double up on a fault,  2.) a certain weakness is occurring because of the close breeding and as such, it has been said that you have at least 25% new blood to keep your breeding program strong and healthy,. 3.)  a certain virtue is desired to enhance your breeding program, such as, a thicker coat, a triple AAA personality, etc.

As you breed your own best in show dog or favorite dog, you eventually use this dog as the basis of your linebreeding and inbreeding, thereby, eventually, creating your own new strain or bloodline.

And so, the game begins.  It is like experimental cooking…a little salt, a little spice….which is like choosing the partner for bitch in season.

Pictured above is my favorite Pomeranian, Ph HOF Am Tha Ch Canton Bravestar.  He is six generation of my breeding and a good representation of the canton bloodline.

September 4, 2009

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Comments

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Hello my bitch has just had her first litter of puppies should i keep any from this litter to help me start a bloodline?

It really depends on the bloodline of the male and the female.....and also where you are willing to start.

Husband and I have two of the most amazing behaved dogs we've both ever owned. A pure bred Mastiff and a pure bred Czech Shepherd. My mastiff female came out with a long more fox like nose instead of the squishy wrinkly nose most Mastiffs get, I prefer this look to the typical bulky mastiff look.

Our goal is to bred our Shep. and Mastiff for Mast-herd (or Sheptiff) pups

Could you further break down how to generate your own line? I don't quite understand

We eventually want a breed like the Labradoodle, a now recognized independent breed

The line that I was talking about refers to purebreed only...not mix breed.

Hi! Very informative blog! I couldn't help but wonder, though. A lot of sources have suggested that inbreeding should never be done because the possibilities of abnormalities surfacing in the puppies would be very huge. Is that really the case or are they just misconceptions? I'm an aspiring breeder myself, and it's my first time to hear that inbreeding is okay...and from a respectable breeder, too!

With inbreeding, you have to choose the best of the best and make sure that both partners do not have the same fault and both comes from excellent lines and quality. When you inbreed, you may have swings in quality...very good and very bad....then it is here you select what you keep and pet out those that are not good enough.

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